Private Charter Safety

  • How a pilot can become certified for safety
  • How to choose a safe charter airline
  • How to research charter companies to see their safety certificates

There are remarkably far fewer aviation fatalities than automobile fatalities occur each year, both in terms of actual numbers and per vehicle-miles traveled. Unlike commercial carriers, charter aviation ventures and private pilots are scrutinized much less. The FAA and DOT aim to review and enforce best practices among aircraft operators Passengers generally engage a private jet or charter service at their own risk. Additionally, the safety of traveling in private charter operated aircraft falls far short of what passengers of commercial aircraft can expect. Over the past 20 years, charter and private aircraft have 9.4 times more probability of crashing over commercial airliners. It is very important to select operators who have rigorous training and rest requirements for their pilots. Other material causes of crashes include mechanical failure, weather, and sabotage; these risks can be bypassed by excellent maintenance, strict procedures for adverse weather conditions, and ample security. areas on which to focus your efforts include certification; safety, security, and maintenance history; pilot requirements; and location-specific expertise.

The single most important way to research potential charter safety is to research the audit history, ratings, and accidents of any potential charter operator. The charter operator should be able to provide audit ratings, or you may be directed to third-party safety auditors (e.g., International Standard for Business Aircraft Operations (IS-BAO), Air Charter Safety Foundation (ACSF), Aviation Research Group U.S. (ARG/US), Wyvern, etc. Additionally, as charter passengers and crew typically do not pass through traditional security procedures, as in commercial terminals, operators should have documented security protocols, including background checks for all employees, security systems and personnel where the aircraft are hangered.

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