Piper Aircraft Corporation

  • The history of Piper Aircraft Corporation
  • The most popular Piper Aircrafts
  • Detailed description of the Piper Cheyenne and the Piper Navajo

 

Piper Aircraft Corporation was established by William T Piper in 1937 and has grown to become one of the leaders in the aviation industry over the 80 years they have been in service. Pipers production started to boom in 1950 around the time of the Korean War, developing a twin-engine aircraft, the Baumann Brigadier, for the United States military. Piper started its T1000 Airline Division in May 1981 where the Piper PA-42 Cheyenne and the Piper T-1020 were manufactured. This airline provided aircrafts for commuter airlines and international airlines overseas in the United Kingdom. Now in the 21st century, Piper has announced the largest order of aircrafts to be manufactured, totaling 152 aircrafts which will take place over the next 7 years.

Piper’s most popular aircrafts are the Piper Cheyenne and the Piper Navajo. The Piper Cheyenne is a turboprop aircraft that has two Pratt & Whitney PT6A-28 engines. The Cheyenne can hold 4-6 passengers with a max takeoff weight of 9,000 lbs. Also, this aircraft can hit a maximum speed of 326 mph at 11,000 ft while having a range of 1,700 nautical miles. The Piper Navajo is a family class, twin-engine aircraft that are designed for the general aviation market for cargo and feeder liner operations. The Piper holds 6-8 passengers in a twin-engine corporate and commuter aircraft powered by two 310 HP Lycoming engines. Pipers CEO Simon Caldecott announced in March 2021 that he would retire and CFO John Calcagno would become the CEO of Piper. Since this change, Piper continues to be one of the world leaders in private aviation


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